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Published in 1981 by Liberation Support Movement with support from the United Nations Centre Against Apartheid. Design/Artwork by Rupert Garcia.

Published in 1981 by Liberation Support Movement with support from the United Nations Centre Against Apartheid. Design/Artwork by Rupert Garcia.

On display in the Lobby Gallery are highlights of African art from the GTM’s permanent collection. The selection of artwork focuses primarily on ritual obejcts and masks, but also includes examples of textiles and currency. Throughout history, objects have served as symbols of spiritual and material power. The masks on display are all associated with strong religious and spiritual beliefs that influence the way a community responds to them. The functions of masks are as complex and varied as their forms.

Giwoyo mask, early 20th century, Democratic Republic of the Congo, wood and fiber. Gift of William Siegmann, 2006.3.3

Giwoyo mask, early 20th century, Democratic Republic of the Congo, wood and fiber. Gift of William Siegmann, 2006.3.3

Alongside the African objects is a display of anti-apartheid posters, pins, and documents that aims to provide some sense of the political struggle against the violent system of racial segregation that was in place in South Africa for much of the 20th century.

The documents and reproductions are examples of the visual material that was used all over the world in the decades long protest of the treatment of black South Africans. We hope that these pieces of history provide some insight into the protest movement and afford some space for reflection on the power and value of mass-movements in a time when injustice and racism are apparent in our own country.

 

YEAR OF SOUTH AFRICA
September 2014 – August 2015
Godwin-Ternbach Museum Lobby Gallery, Klapper Hall 4th Floor
www.qc.cuny.edu/godwin_ternbach

women's choir

As the Year of South Africa draws to a close, we are delighted to welcome Mollie Stone, expert in choral music from South Africa, for a two-day residency at Queens College. Join us in one, or two, or all three of the workshops she will be leading on April 28 and April 29.

Linguistic and Musical Diversity in South Africa

Tuesday, April 28
4:45-6:30 PM
Music Building, Room 264

Using choral music, this workshop will provide an overview of linguistic diversity in South Africa, including languages using non-pulmonic consonants (“clicks”). A particular focus will be how we may use music to teach language, and how studying language gives a deeper understanding of music. The workshop is designed for faculty but all are encouraged to attend, including students. The Queens College Women’s Choir will give a short performance during the workshop.


South African Choral Music

Wednesday, April 29
12:15-1:30 PM
Music Building, Room 226

Participants will learn a selection of choral music from South Africa, including pronunciation, movement, and historical context. Come sing!


Teaching South African Choral Music: Pedagogy and Style



Wednesday, April 29
4:30-7:00 PM
Music Building, Room 214

This workshop, oriented to teachers and students in education programs​, will explore methods of teaching South African choral music and shaping musical style.


head shot of Mollie Stone. Mollie Stone is Assistant Director of Choral Activities at the University of Chicago, Director of World Music and a conductor at Chicago Children’s Choir, teacher for Village Harmony, and co-director/founder of both the Brooklyn World Music Chorus, and the Chicago World Music Chorus.

Ms. Stone holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Amherst College, a Master of Music degree in conducting from Westminster Choir College and has studied at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Stone is currently completing a doctorate in choral conducting at Northwestern University, where she is writing her dissertation on how South Africans are using choral music in the struggle against HIV.

In 2001, Stone received a grant from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation to produce a teaching DVD (Vela Vela) that helps American choral directors learn and teach black South African choral music more authentically in the oral tradition. Since then, she worked with Patty Cuyler and Chicago Children’s Choir to produce a new series of teaching DVDs on Georgian, South African and Bulgarian music as part of a series called Raising the Bar: A new multi-cultural resource book/teaching DVD series. In 2006, Stone received another generous grant from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation to return to South Africa to study how South Africans are using choral music in the struggle against HIV.

In 2011, Stone spent ten weeks touring across Europe, performing and giving workshops with the ensemble Northern Harmony in Corsica, France, Switzerland, Germany, England and Wales. Stone currently lectures and gives workshops on black South African choral music across the United States and Europe.

In 2015, Wesley van Eeden unveiled The Taxi Dance, a mural-style painting commissioned for the Queens College campus. Professors Noah Tsika (Media Studies) and Jason Tougaw (English) discussed Van Eeden’s artistic process and influences, particularly music. They screened music videos that represented aspects of contemporary life in South Africa seldom understood outside the nation’s borders. Artists included in the presentation were Spoek Mathambo, Die Antwoord, and BoyznBuck$.

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Wesley van Eeden is an artist, illustrator, graphic designer and painter who works for clients across the world as well as exhibiting his personal work in various galleries–including designs on skateboards, political murals, and portraits.

Noah Tsika is Assistant Professor of Media Studies. He is the author of Nollywood Stars: Media and Migration in West Africa and the Diaspora and Gods and Monsters: A Queer Film Classic. He teaches courses on African cinema.

Jason Tougaw is Associate Professor of English. He is the author of Strange Cases: The Medical Case History and the British Novel and co-editor (with Nancy K. Miller) of Extremities: Trauma, Testimony, and Community. He teaches a course on “Memoirs of Life in South Africa.”

April 29, 2015
The Godwin-Ternbach Museum, Queens College

 

Sponsors: Year of South Africa, Department of English & Department of Art

Thursday, March 19, 6 pm
ART/ACTIVISM Performance/Roundtable on Art as Social Activism
with Martha Wilson (Franklin Furnace founder and artist), Maureen Connor (Queens College Art Department), Riccardo Valentine (Brother(hood) member), followed by performances by activist dance collective Brother(hood) and reading with Tonya Foster (CCNY author), a gumboot dance by Queens College students, and responsive readings by Queens College and Pratt Institute writing program students.

Presented in conjunction with Year of South Africa Exhibitions at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum

Exhibition descriptions: Year of South Africa
February 5 – March 21, 2015
Opening Reception February 5, 6-8 pm

Collection of Violet and Les Payne
Paintings and works on paper collected by Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who reported during the student uprising in the black township of Soweto in 1976, will be on view in the main gallery. Returning to Soweto in 1985, he wrote about changes that had taken place in the intervening years and began a collection of paintings and works on paper which captured everyday life and a sense of hope despite the immense turmoil that had surrounded the artists. The exhibition includes works by David Mbele, Velaphi Mzimba, Hargreaves Ntukwana, Winston Saoli and Percy Konqobe, among others. Many of these artists are now internationally recognized.

Next Generation: Emerging Photographers from South Africa
Through a partnership with the Roger Ballen Foundation of Johannesburg, an organization dedicated to the advancement of photographic education in South Africa, works by Musa Nxumalo, Sanele Moya and Sipho Mpongo will be on display in the mezzanine gallery. Photographs by this younger generation, who came of age after the abolition of apartheid and the first democratic election in 1994, reflect the momentous political and social shifts that have taken place since the Soweto Uprising and the death of Nelson Mandela in 2013. An online catalogue will be presented in conjunction with this exhibition.

Public programs include: Opening Reception, Gallery Talk by Les Payne, Roundtable Panel on Global and African Apartheid with Les Payne, Satadru Sen (Queens College History Department) and Richard Knight (Director of African Activist ARchive), Talk with Robert Sember (Artist and South African Native), Art as Activism panel and performance, Interactive Q&A with South African Photographers, and a film series.

Generous support for this exhibition and its programs has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Roger Ballen Foundation, Queens College Foundation, Queens Community Savings Bank, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation and Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 11 am – 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am – 5 pm

Women in Leadership: Economic Justice in “UnBankable” Communities

YOSA_SharedInterest_033115[1]

Shared Interest, a non-profit social investment fund, provides access to credit and mentorship for microenterprise and small business owners, farmers and cooperative members. The majority of these business owners are women, and would otherwise be considered “unbankable.”

March 31st, 2015
Campbell Dome, Queens College
5:00PM-6:30PM
View/Download Flyer

picture of Dona KatzinDonna Katzin, Executive Director of Shared Interest, will highlight themes related to community and international development, impact investing, women’s leadership, and strategies to promote social and economic justice.

 

 

Event Sponsors: Office of the Provost, Center for Teaching and Learning, CUNY Service Corps@Queens College, Student Life, and CERRU.

South Africa: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow provides a personal glimpse into South Africa based on The City University of New York Board of Trustees’ Vice Chairperson Philip Berry’s experiences with South Africa over the years. The talk highlights some of the pivotal economic, political, historical, global and social occurrences that inform the role of South Africa on the continent and in the world as an emerging market.

April 21, 2015
5:00PM-6:30PM
Campbell Dome, Queens College

Leonard Thompson’s book, A History of South Africa, 4th edition, 2014 (updated by Lynn Berat) provides excellent background for this lecture.

South Africa- Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow Philip A. Berry, Vice Chairperson, City University of New York Board of TrusteesPhilip Alfonso Berry received a BA in Sociology from Queens College, an Associate’s Degree in Marketing from Borough of Manhattan Community College, an MBA from Xavier University of Cincinnati, and an MSW from Columbia University in New York.

In June 2006, he was appointed by Governor George Pataki to the Board of The City University of New York. In June 2007, he was appointed Vice Chairperson of the Board by Governor Eliot Spitzer. In 2010, he was reappointed for a seven-year term by Governor David Paterson.

Currently, Mr. Berry is President of Philip Berry Associates LLC, which provides executive coaching, leadership training, diversity consulting and organizational development services.

Until recently he was Vice President, Global Workplace Initiatives and Corporate Officer for Colgate-Palmolive, a Fortune 500 global consumer products company, since 2004. He lead the company’s efforts to attract, develop and retain a diverse workforce and is responsible for developing, implementing and evaluating diversity and inclusion strategies on a global basis, along with government compliance.

From 2001 to 2003 he was Vice President, Global Employee Relations & Best Place to Work, in charge of employee relations strategy and policies worldwide, and developing the company as an employer of choice.

Mr. Berry, who joined Colgate-Palmolive in 1990, served as Vice President of Human Resources for its European Division from 1998 to 2001 providing strategic and operational leadership throughout the Continent; subsequent to that, from 1990 to 1998, he handled Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, Central Europe and Asia. Mr. Berry was Vice President of Human Resources for the Triboro Bridge and Tunnel Authority prior to joining Colgate-Palmolive, and also worked for Procter & Gamble and the Urban League.

He is a member of CUNY’s Business Leadership Council and the Acting Chair of the CUNY Construction Fund. In 2004 he received the Governor’s Award for Community Distinction, and in 2003 he was selected by Crain’s New York Business as one of New York’s 100 most influential Black business executives.

Please RSVP at: http://goo.gl/WZsrSB

Click here to view/download flyer

Artist and South African native Robert Sember will present a consideration of the accomplishments and ongoing social justice struggles in contemporary South Africa as represented in its music, film, visual works, museums and other cultural institutions.

Tuesday, March 10, 4:30 pm

South Africa is beginning its third decade as a multi-racial democracy. While the state sanctioned racism of the apartheid era is over, the country continues to confront painful and often worsening racial, gender and economic inequalities. Cultural workers and cultural institutions, key actors in the anti-apartheid struggle, are now enrolled in shaping and organizing the country’s complex and often contradictory efforts to realize the democratic promise of the post-apartheid era.

Robert Sember is an artist, researcher, and member of the sound art collective Ultra-red, which organizes projects around constituencies involved in migrant rights, the AIDS crisis, fair housing, and anti-racism. As a resident of South Africa until 1988 he participated in the student anti-apartheid struggle. In recent years, he has returned to South Africa to contribute its efforts to address the HIV/AIDS crisis.

Presented in conjunction with Year of South Africa exhibitions at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum

Exhibition descriptions:
Year of South Africa
February 5 – March 21, 2015
Opening Reception February 5, 6-8 pm

Collection of Violet and Les Payne
Paintings and works on paper collected by Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who reported during the student uprising in the black township of Soweto in 1976, will be on view in the main gallery. Returning to Soweto in 1985, he wrote about changes that had taken place in the intervening years and began a collection of paintings and works on paper which captured everyday life and a sense of hope despite the immense turmoil that had surrounded the artists. The exhibition includes works by David Mbele, Velaphi Mzimba, Hargreaves Ntukwana, Winston Saoli and Percy Konqobe, among others. Many of these artists are now internationally recognized.

Next Generation: Emerging Photographers from South Africa
Through a partnership with the Roger Ballen Foundation of Johannesburg, an organization dedicated to the advancement of photographic education in South Africa, works by Musa Nxumalo, Sanele Moya and Sipho Mpongo will be on display in the mezzanine gallery. Photographs by this younger generation, who came of age after the abolition of apartheid and the first democratic election in 1994, reflect the momentous political and social shifts that have taken place since the Soweto Uprising and the death of Nelson Mandela in 2013. An online catalogue will be presented in conjunction with this exhibition.

Public programs include: Opening Reception, Gallery Talk by Les Payne, Roundtable Panel on Global and African Apartheid with Les Payne, Satadru Sen (Queens College History Department) and Richard Knight (Director of African Activist ARchive), Talk with Robert Sember (Artist and South African Native), Art as Activism panel and performance, Interactive Q&A with South African Photographers, and a film series.

Generous support for this exhibition and its programs has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Roger Ballen Foundation, Queens College Foundation, Queens Community Savings Bank, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation and Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 11 am – 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am – 5 pm

Monday, March 9, 5:30 pm
Five Roads to Freedom: From Apartheid to the World Cup (Directed by Robin Benger and Jane Thandi Lipman, 2010, 52 minutes)

Click here for flyer
This documentary looks at South Africa’s revolutionary transformation through the eyes of five men and women who lived under the shadow of apartheid. The documentary focuses on five individuals from across the social and political spectrum, ordinary people whose experiences are representative of the profound changes of the past 15 years and whose lives in 2010 reflect both the promise and the ambiguities of today’s South Africa. Five Roads to Freedom is a deeply personal project for filmmaker Robin Benger. As a South African student leader in the late 1960s and early 1970s, he was arrested three times for anti-apartheid activities, and ultimately expelled from the country.

Presented in conjunction with Year of South Africa Exhibitions at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum

Exhibition descriptions:
Year of South Africa
February 5 – March 21, 2015
Opening Reception February 5, 6-8 pm

Collection of Violet and Les Payne
Paintings and works on paper collected by Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who reported during the student uprising in the black township of Soweto in 1976, will be on view in the main gallery. Returning to Soweto in 1985, he wrote about changes that had taken place in the intervening years and began a collection of paintings and works on paper which captured everyday life and a sense of hope despite the immense turmoil that had surrounded the artists. The exhibition includes works by David Mbele, Velaphi Mzimba, Hargreaves Ntukwana, Winston Saoli and Percy Konqobe, among others. Many of these artists are now internationally recognized.

Next Generation: Emerging Photographers from South Africa
Through a partnership with the Roger Ballen Foundation of Johannesburg, an organization dedicated to the advancement of photographic education in South Africa, works by Musa Nxumalo, Sanele Moya and Sipho Mpongo will be on display in the mezzanine gallery. Photographs by this younger generation, who came of age after the abolition of apartheid and the first democratic election in 1994, reflect the momentous political and social shifts that have taken place since the Soweto Uprising and the death of Nelson Mandela in 2013. An online catalogue will be presented in conjunction with this exhibition.

Public programs include: Opening Reception, Gallery Talk by Les Payne, Roundtable Panel on Global and African Apartheid with Les Payne, Satadru Sen (Queens College History Department) and Richard Knight (Director of African Activist ARchive), Talk with Robert Sember (Artist and South African Native), Art as Activism panel and performance, Interactive Q&A with South African Photographers, and a film series.

Generous support for this exhibition and its programs has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Roger Ballen Foundation, Queens College Foundation, Queens Community Savings Bank, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation and Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 11 am – 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am – 5 pm

Tuesday, March 3, 5:30 pm
Long Night’s Journey Into Day (Directed by Frances Reid and Deborah Hoffman, 2000, 94 minutes)

Click here for flyer
Following the end of apartheid in South Africa during the 1990s, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission was established to pursue social justice.  This acclaimed documentary focuses on some of the stories that emerged from the organization’s cases. Although renowned leader Bishop Desmond Tutu appears, the film focuses primarily on everyday people, both white and black, who committed appalling crimes during apartheid and came to the commission seeking forgiveness.

Presented in conjunction with Year of South Africa exhibitions at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum

Exhibition descriptions:
Year of South Africa
February 5 – March 21, 2015
Opening Reception February 5, 6-8 pm

Collection of Violet and Les Payne
Paintings and works on paper collected by Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who reported during the student uprising in the black township of Soweto in 1976, will be on view in the main gallery. Returning to Soweto in 1985, he wrote about changes that had taken place in the intervening years and began a collection of paintings and works on paper which captured everyday life and a sense of hope despite the immense turmoil that had surrounded the artists. The exhibition includes works by David Mbele, Velaphi Mzimba, Hargreaves Ntukwana, Winston Saoli and Percy Konqobe, among others. Many of these artists are now internationally recognized.

Next Generation: Emerging Photographers from South Africa
Through a partnership with the Roger Ballen Foundation of Johannesburg, an organization dedicated to the advancement of photographic education in South Africa, works by Musa Nxumalo, Sanele Moya and Sipho Mpongo will be on display in the mezzanine gallery. Photographs by this younger generation, who came of age after the abolition of apartheid and the first democratic election in 1994, reflect the momentous political and social shifts that have taken place since the Soweto Uprising and the death of Nelson Mandela in 2013. An online catalogue will be presented in conjunction with this exhibition.

Public programs include: Opening Reception, Gallery Talk by Les Payne, Roundtable Panel on Global and African Apartheid with Les Payne, Satadru Sen (Queens College History Department) and Richard Knight (Director of African Activist ARchive), Talk with Robert Sember (Artist and South African Native), Art as Activism panel and performance, Interactive Q&A with South African Photographers, and a film series.

Generous support for this exhibition and its programs has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Roger Ballen Foundation, Queens College Foundation, Queens Community Savings Bank, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation and Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 11 am – 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am – 5 pm

Thursday, February 26, 5:30 pm
Searching for Sugar Man (Directed by Malik Bendjelloul, 2012, 87 minutes)

Click here for flyer
This Swedish-British documentary is about Cape Town fans of American musician Sixto Rodriguez whose music was not popular in American but widely popular in South Africa. The musician was unaware of his success in South African because of apartheid censorship and sanctions. Awards include Academy Award, Directors Guild of America, and Writers Guild of America Producers Guild of America and Sundance Film Festival Award for Best Documentary.

Presented in conjunction with Year of South African exhibitions at the Godwin-Ternbach Museum

Exhibition descriptions:
Year of South Africa
February 5 – March 21, 2015
Opening Reception February 5, 6-8 pm

Collection of Violet and Les Payne
Paintings and works on paper collected by Les Payne, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who reported during the student uprising in the black township of Soweto in 1976, will be on view in the main gallery. Returning to Soweto in 1985, he wrote about changes that had taken place in the intervening years and began a collection of paintings and works on paper which captured everyday life and a sense of hope despite the immense turmoil that had surrounded the artists. The exhibition includes works by David Mbele, Velaphi Mzimba, Hargreaves Ntukwana, Winston Saoli and Percy Konqobe, among others. Many of these artists are now internationally recognized.

Next Generation: Emerging Photographers from South Africa
Through a partnership with the Roger Ballen Foundation of Johannesburg, an organization dedicated to the advancement of photographic education in South Africa, works by Musa Nxumalo, Sanele Moya and Sipho Mpongo will be on display in the mezzanine gallery. Photographs by this younger generation, who came of age after the abolition of apartheid and the first democratic election in 1994, reflect the momentous political and social shifts that have taken place since the Soweto Uprising and the death of Nelson Mandela in 2013. An online catalogue will be presented in conjunction with this exhibition.

Public programs include: Opening Reception, Gallery Talk by Les Payne, Roundtable Panel on Global and African Apartheid with Les Payne, Satadru Sen (Queens College History Department) and Richard Knight (Director of African Activist ARchive), Talk with Robert Sember (Artist and South African Native), Art as Activism panel and performance, Interactive Q&A with South African Photographers, and a film series.

Generous support for this exhibition and its programs has been provided by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York Council for the Humanities, the Roger Ballen Foundation, Queens College Foundation, Queens Community Savings Bank, Milton & Sally Avery Arts Foundation and Friends of the Godwin-Ternbach Museum.

Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday: 11 am – 7 pm
Saturdays: 11 am – 5 pm

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